Quantitative proteomics of fractionated membrane and lumen exosome proteins from isogenic metastatic and non-metastatic bladder cancer cells reveal differential expression of EMT factors

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Dennis Kjølhede Jeppesen
  • Arkadiusz Nawrocki
  • Steffen Grann Jensen
  • Kasper Thorsen
  • Bradley Joseph Whitehead
  • Kenneth Alan Howard
  • Lars Dyrskjøt
  • Torben Falck Orntoft
  • Martin Røssel Larsen
  • Marie Stampe Ostenfeld

View graph of relations

Cancer cells secrete soluble factors and various extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, into their tissue microenvironment. The secretion of exosomes is speculated to facilitate local invasion and metastatic spread. Here, we used an in vivo metastasis model of human bladder carcinoma cell line T24 without metastatic capacity and its two isogenic derivate cell lines SLT4 and FL3, which form metastases in the lungs and liver of mice, respectively. Cultivation in CLAD1000 bioreactors rather than conventional culture flasks resulted in a 13-16-fold increased exosome yield and facilitated quantitative proteomics of fractionated exosomes. Exosomes from T24, SLT4, and FL3 cells were partitioned into membrane and luminal fractions and changes in protein abundance related to the gain of metastatic capacity were identified by quantitative iTRAQ- proteomics. We identified several proteins linked to epithelial-mesenchymal-transition, including increased abundance of Vimentin and HDGF in the membrane, and Casein Kinase II α and Annexin A2 in the lumen of exosomes, respectively, from metastatic cells. The change in exosome protein abundance correlated little, although significant for FL3 vs. T24, with changes in cellular mRNA expression. Our proteomic approach may help identification of proteins in the membrane and lumen of exosomes potentially involved in the metastatic process. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
LanguageEnglish
JournalProteomics
Volume14
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)699–712
ISSN1615-9853
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014